Travel Books

Off The Shelf

 

There is nothing better than getting lost in a good travel book.  A good writer places the readers right in the middle of story where the reader feels he/she is traveling along with the author.  Here is a list of travel books I have in my collection.  If you have a travel book you recommend, please send me a message through my contact page.  I’ll place it in this list with your first name and a link back to your website.  Help build my library.

 

Travels-with-charley-cover

With Charley, his French poodle, Steinbeck drives the interstates and the country roads, dines with truckers, encounters bears at Yellowstone and old friends in San Francisco. Along the way he reflects on the American character, racial hostility, the particular form of American loneliness he finds almost everywhere, and  the unexpected kindness of strangers.

 

Under the Tuscan Sun

Frances Mayes—widely published poet, gourmet cook, and travel writer—opens the door to a wondrous new world when she buys and restores an abandoned villa in the spectacular Tuscan countryside. In evocative language, she brings the reader along as she discovers the beauty and simplicity of life in Italy. Mayes also creates dozens of delicious seasonal recipes from her traditional kitchen and simple garden, all of which she includes in the book. Doing for Tuscany what M.F.K. Fisher and Peter Mayle did for Provence, Mayes writes about the tastes and pleasures of a foreign country with gusto and passion.

 

Every Day in Tuscany

Frances Mayes—widely published poet, gourmet cook, and travel writer—opnes the door to a wondrous new world when she buys and restores an abandoned villa in the spectacular Tuscan countryside. In evocative language, she brings the reader along as she discovers the beauty and simplicity of life in Italy. Mayes also creates dozens of delicious seasonal recipes from her traditional kitchen and simple garden, all of which she includes in the book. Doing for Tuscany what M.F.K. Fisher and Peter Mayle did for Provence, Mayes writes about the tastes and pleasures of a foreign country with gusto and passion.

 

Bella Tuscany

Frances Mayes, whose enchanting #1 New York Times bestseller Under the Tuscan Sun made the world fall in love with Tuscany, invites us back for a delightful new season of friendship, festivity, and food, there and throughout Italy.

 

A Walk in the Woods

The Appalachian Trail trail stretches from Georgia to Maine and covers some of the most breathtaking terrain in America–majestic mountains, silent forests, sparking lakes. If you’re going to take a hike, it’s probably the place to go. And Bill Bryson is surely the most entertaining guide you’ll find. He introduces us to the history and ecology of the trail and to some of the other hardy (or just foolhardy) folks he meets along the way–and a couple of bears. Already a classic, A Walk in the Woods will make you long for the great outdoors (or at least a comfortable chair to sit and read in).

 

Into the Wild

In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter.  How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.

 

Back to the Wild

The photographs and writings of Christopher McCandless. This book contains original photographs, postcards and journal entries from Christopher McCandless during his 2yr journey throughout the Western United States, Mexico, Canada and Alaska. Featuring Hal Holbrook, Wayne Westerberg and Jan Burres

 

The Best American Travel Writing 2013

Number-one New York Times best-selling author of Eat, Pray, Love and Committed: A Love Story, Elizabeth Gilbert transports readers to far-flung locales with this collection of the year’s lushest and most inspiring travel writing.

 

The Best American Travel Writing 2014

A far-ranging collection of the best travel writing pieces published in 2013, collected by guest editor Paul Theroux. The Best American Travel Writing consistently includes a wide variety of pieces, illuminating the wonder, humor, fear, and exhilaration that greets all of us when we embark on a journey to a new place. Readers know that there is simply no other option when they want great travel writing.

 

A Moveable Feast

Hemingway’s experiences in France during the 1920’s.

 

101 Places to get Fucked Up

Looking for a guidebook that isn’t full of tired, lame, or even BS travel information? 101 Places to Get Fucked Up Before You Die brings together the most irreverent and legit accounts of drinking, nightlife and travel culture around the world. Part guide, part social commentary, part party invitation, 101 Places gives you all the info and inspiration you’ll need to:

* Blowout one (or several) of the year’s biggest festivals
* MacGyver your way into underground clubs and backcountry raves
* Throw down with people from the Himalayas to the salt flats to Antarctica
* Travel in every conceivable style―from baller to dirtbag―to some of the most epic spots on earth

 

The Innocents Abroad

In 1867, Mark Twain and a group fellow-Americans toured Europe and the Holy Land, aboard a retired Civil War ship known as “Quaker City.” Throughout the journey, Twain kept a written record of his experiences. “The Innocents Abroad” is both a travelogue and a critique of clashing cultures—but more importantly, it is an entertaining and insightful work written by one of the great masters of American prose.

 

Anthony Bourdain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More than just a companion to the hugely popular show, No Reservations is Bourdain’s fully illustrated journal of his far-flung travels. The book traces his trips from New Zealand to New Jersey and everywhere in between, mixing beautiful, never-before-seen photos and mementos with Bourdain’s outrageous commentary on what really happens when you give a bad-boy chef an open ticket to the world. Want to know where to get good fatty crab in Rangoon? How to order your reindeer medium rare? How to tell a Frenchman that his baguette is invading your personal space? This is your book. For any Bourdain fan, this is an indispensable opportunity to hit the road with the man himself.

 

Falling off the map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The author of Video Night in Kathmandu ups the ante on himself in this sublimely evocative and acerbically funny tour through the world’s loneliest and most eccentric places. From Iceland to Bhutan to Argentina, Iyer remains both uncannily observant and hilarious.

 

The Lady and the Monk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Pico Iyer decided to go to Kyoto and live in a monastery, he did so to learn about Zen Buddhism from the inside, to get to know Kyoto, one of the loveliest old cities in the world, and to find out something about Japanese culture today — not the world of businessmen and production lines, but the traditional world of changing seasons and the silence of temples, of the images woven through literature, of the lunar Japan that still lives on behind the rising sun of geopolitical power.

Falling Off the Map and The Lady and the Monk are recommended by my friend Tanya Raj.  She lives in Bangalore, India.  Click on the links to learn more about Tanya and Banglaore.  Thank you Tanya!

 

the-lost-continent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An unsparing and hilarious account of one man’s rediscovery of America and his search for the perfect small town. The Lost Continent chronicles Bill Bryson’s 13,978 mile trip around the United States in the autumn of 1987 and spring 1988. This is Bryson’s first travel book.