Hipmunk City Love-ing Everything About Munich

“Blog Post Type: Expert Opinion Piece”

Beer for breakfast. Wait?!? A cup of coffee? Cappuccino or espresso instead? Which drink pairs best with a Munchner Weisswurst? Munchner Weisswurst is a traditional Bavarian breakfast consisting of a veal-based sausage served with sweet mustard, a Brezn prezel, and accompanied by a Weissbier (‘white beer’). When in Rome do as the…wait…this is Munich, where beer flows like water and Bavarian cuisine is prominent in everyday meals. A Weissbier is usually served with this traditional breakfast so…when in Munich, do as the Germans do.

Munich beer

Photo by Yasmin via Trover.com

Munich is the capital city of Bavaria in Germany. It’s rich beer culture is second to none and celebrated year round in beer halls and beer gardens throughout the State with the Oktoberfest as the main event. With nearly 7 million people attending a festival this large in 2011 and replicated throughout the world, there is no doubt beer is the national beverage. Drink a Weissbier with the munchner weisswurst? When in Munich, do as the locals do.

For those who are not beer drinkers, you’re in luck. Munich has a strong coffee culture with cafés spread throughout the city. Locals love sitting outside in the sun drinking coffee and watching the crowds go by. Drink coffee and people watch with the locals or take the high-powered drink and go wandering. Tough choice, but easily solvable. Do both. Start the morning at a local café. Sip your espresso and watch how Germans greet and interact with each other. With many English-speaking Bavarians in Munich, a traveler may find a new friend, guide, or travel companion for company while walking the city.

Munich cafe

Photo by Sofia N via Trover.com

Whether one finds a local for a guide or tramping solo, there are plenty of places to see that represent Munich’s art culture, architecture, and history. In the 1800’s, Bavarian Kings made Munich the art capital of Germany and today, Bavaria’s capital city is home to 6 museums, 40 galleries, and 7 art schools. World-class collections are found throughout these buildings showcasing a rich history so deep and expansive, it will take several trips to see everything. I recommend a specific itinerary.

Briennerstraße, Ludwigstraße, Maximilianstraße, and Prinzregentenstraße are the four Royal Avenues and Squares that run through the inner city. Briennerstraße, lined with neo-classical buildings has shops, restaurants, and galleries on its eastern end. Named after King Ludwig I of Bavaria, Ludwigstraße avenue displays Italian romanesque buildings and is the grandest avenue of the four Royal Avenues showing a very uniform look. Maximilianstraße is in the center of town with upscale shops and boutiques. The Haus der Kunst, Schachgalerie, and the Bavarian National Museum are several museums seen along Prinzregentenstraße Avenue. Prinzregentenstraße is rich in history including alterations made along this avenue by the Nazi’s during WWII.

Munich

Photo by At the end of the Rainbow via Trover.com

Palaces, castles, museums, churches, historic buildings, and landmarks are in abundance. I recommend researching Munich and writing specific itineraries before arrival. I also recommend staying as close to the center of the city as possible as it is a good hub for exploring. Hotels in Munich are close to public transportation when you are ready to venture further from the heart of Munichen – “by the monks.”

About the Writer

Tony is a freelance travel writer and photographer, roller coaster enthusiast and self-proclaimed Sudoku master. He’s based in the Midwest U.S. and blogs at The Walking Traveler. He is working with Hipmunk on their #HipmunkCityLove Project.

Feature Photo by Travel Notes & Beyond via Trover.com

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